Featured Artists

May: Dorothy Frey and Jenny Germann

Dorothy Frey

Give a brief description of your upcoming show. And what might have inspired it.

The still life and interior paintings included in Middle Ground are scenes observed from my studio or my house. I’ve drawn or painted from my immediate surroundings, whether interior or exterior, since I was a student.

How have you expanded existing themes/ideas for which you are best known/or if this body of work is a great deviation from your norm, what inspired this new approach?

The approach is no different than when I paint from the landscape, for which I’m better known. I have been contemplating interior paintings series for years, to continue my process of finding and composing the abstraction in observation.

Stylistically and/or technically, what do you hope collectors notice in your new work?

I want viewers to sense something familiar and relatable in my work. I find abstraction in the observed space through hidden pathways. They are easy to see; it is what swirls your eye through the composition.

 

Jenny Germann

Give a brief description of your upcoming show. And what might have inspired it.

Lancaster, A Love Letter is made up of paintings from areas around the city that represent my perspective of living here. While an ode to Lancaster is certainly not an original idea, I wanted to paint my experience in the 9 years that I have lived in this wonderful place.  I get to be immersed in the creative culture of our profound city and am constantly inspired by the talent of the makers that reside here. This city makes it a priority to foster creative pursuits and support the beautification of the area through art installations.

Another reason I deeply love Lancaster is the amount of goodwill that exists here. I have had the privilege of working in the nonprofit sector for the last 9 years and seen firsthand the generosity that this community is capable of.  The local support for education, the arts, disadvantaged youth and so many worthy community benefit organizations is truly uplifting. In fact, Lancaster takes 20 times more refugees per capita than any other city in the United States.  That our city cares that much about acceptance and welcoming speaks volumes for the people that reside here.  It also speaks to the quality of organizations and people that facilitate these efforts.

While there are many areas for growth – there are so many more areas of goodness and positivity. And so many engaged citizens willing to tackle these issues.

How have you expanded existing themes/ideas for which you are best known/or if this body of work is a great deviation from your norm, what inspired this new approach?

Typically, my woodburned paintings are of places that are meaningful to me. This body of work is a more defined collection solely of Lancaster locations.

Stylistically and/or technically, what do you hope collectors notice in your new work?

I use a blend of pyrography (woodburning) and painting to express my vision. Pyrography lends a controlled and physically satisfying aspect to the work, whereas the painting is experimental and evocative. I mix mediums as a way to communicate perspective, using making as a form of introspection, and personal expression. I hope that collectors notice the play between mediums and the personality of each piece.

Add any additional info that might interest the viewer.

My husband, Evan Germann, a furniture designer and cabinetmaker, creates all of my frames.